Section 8 Denial in Arkansas

Applicants who receive an AR Section 8 denial letter in the mail after waiting two weeks for processing may find themselves disappointed. What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Arkansas? The denial letter will contain details about the section 8 housing disqualifications relevant to the application in question. While rare, there is a chance that the Section 8 denial was made in error. There may be legal grounds to make a Section 8 denial appeal if that is the case. To learn more about Section 8 housing disqualifications and how to appeal Section 8 denial in Arkansas, consult the topics below:

  • What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Arkansas?
  • What to do if Section 8 application was denied in Arkansas
  • Learn how to appeal Section 8 denial in Arkansas

What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Arkansas?

Section 8 housing disqualifications in Arkansas happen most often due to documentation. It is not uncommon for applicants to either misunderstand what was required in terms of necessary documentation or to accidentally leave out a piece of documentation altogether. In order to decrease the chance of receiving a Section 8 denial letter, applicants are advised to consult local housing authority representatives for guidance when filling out applications. In the state of Arkansas, an applicant with any criminal charges may be at a disadvantage for Section 8 housing. Also, automatic Section 8 housing disqualifications for criminal activity include any charges of sexual misconduct and methamphetamine production or distribution.

Section 8 denial letters may be given out if an applicant's income is too high. Other probable reasons for Section 8 housing disqualifications are failing to be a United States citizen or legal resident of the state of Arkansas. Likewise, failing to make payments or falling behind on payments for child support or rent could also contribute to Section 8 denial.

What to Do if Section 8 Application Was Denied in Arkansas

Section 8 housing disqualifications occur for various reasons. If an applicant is disqualified, applicants are urged to assess the Section 8 denial letter which will list reasons for the disqualification. When the denial letter arrives in the mail, the applicant should check to see if they were denied Section 8 at the federal level, state level, or both. In many cases, the applicant might find that Section 8 housing disqualifications are given at only one level rather than both, because housing authorities at different levels have dissimilar processing guidelines. For example, federal-level housing must disqualify any household member that has ever been engaged in illegal substance use, while state-level housing may not necessarily deny the housing application. Other reasons warranting an automatic Section 8 housing disqualification are any household members registered as a lifetime sex offender, with a history of eviction, or those suspected of serious alcohol abuse.

It is important to note that if an applicant or a convicted member of an applicant's household has not engaged in criminal activity for a minimum of five years, they may be able to make a Section 8 denial appeal to the housing authority. If the applicant in question can provide adequate information in the form of signed rehabilitation program reports, he or she may be able to persuade the housing authority to reconsider the application.

Learn How to Appeal Section 8 Denial in Arkansas

While Section 8 housing disqualifications are rarely made in error, your housing authority is not infallible; processing mistakes sometimes occur. If you feel your application was denied in error, you are encouraged to file a Section 8 denial appeal with the housing authority as soon as possible. A Section 8 denial appeal in Arkansas is the process by which an applicant can request a reevaluation of the denied application by an informal court. If you are unsure of how to appeal Section 8 denial, contact your local housing authority agency for assistance on initiating the process. Do not falter when filing a Section 8 denial appeal, as you only have 14 to 30 days to file an appeal after the denial is issued.

After the AR Section 8 denial appeal process has begun, both the applicant and the local housing authority will meet in front of a hearing officer or administrative judge to explain their sides of the case. Once the judge or officer has heard both sides of the case and reviewed the Section 8 denial letter, they will make their decision. If the hearing is ruled in favor of the housing authority and the applicant disagrees with said ruling, the applicant can opt to take the Section 8 denial appeal to the Supreme Court. Unless circumstances are extreme, it is not recommended to take cases to the Supreme Court as proceedings could take a number of months before a resolution is reached.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.