Section 8 Denial in Connecticut

Section 8 denial letters are an unfortunate yet frequent part of the low income housing application process in Connecticut. What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in CT? Sometimes an applicant will receive Section 8 housing disqualifications for something as simple as an incomplete or incorrect portion on his or her application form. Other times a Section 8 denial letter may be sent out for more serious reasons, like a failed criminal background evaluation or non-citizenship. In any case, applicants can determine whether there is just recourse for a Section 8 denial appeal by reviewing the Section 8 housing disqualifications listed in their denial letter. For more information on what to do if Section 8 application was denied in Connecticut, peruse the following topics:

  • What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Connecticut?
  • What to do if Section 8 application was denied in Connecticut?
  • Learn how to appeal Section 8 denial in Connecticut
  • How to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications in Connecticut

What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Connecticut?

As discouraging as it is to receive Section 8 housing disqualifications, most of the time the public housing authority has valid reasons for the rejection. Typically, a Section 8 denial letter in CT is issued because the housing authority is not able to verify some portion of the application with the documentation provided. This can either be a result of a lack of proper documentation or a discrepancy with the application. What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Connecticut? Even if an applicant is reasonably certain that he or she filled out the application correctly, it only takes the smallest of mistakes to render an application void. Upon receipt of a Section 8 denial letter, review the disqualifications mentioned. It could be the case that there is no issue with the documentation or the application, but rather an applicant's criminal history has warranted a denial. It is quite common for Section 8 denial letters to be issued to applicants who have severe or lengthy criminal records. Even if the applicant does not have a criminal record, so long as one member of the household has a criminal record, the application will be evaluated taking the criminal past into account.

What to do if Section 8 application was denied in Connecticut?

If you receive a Section 8 denial letter, there are a few course of action to undertake. Firstly, review the letter thoroughly, focusing especially on the reasons for disqualification. Next, create a Section 8 housing disqualifications list from what you have gathered from the letter. With your Section 8 denial letter and the list of disqualifications, schedule a visit to your local housing authority agency. A housing authority representative can help you determine whether there is sufficient recourse for a Section 8 denial appeal by reviewing your letter and disqualification list. It could be the case that your letter was issued erroneously, in which case the representative can assist you by explaining how to appeal Section 8 denial.

Learn How to Appeal Section 8 Denial in Connecticut

While the housing authority strives to be as thorough and accurate with their verification process as possible, sometimes mistakes do occur. In the case where an applicant believes his or her CT Section 8 denial letter was issued erroneously, he or she can request a denial appeal. Section 8 denial appeals consist of a third-party review of the Section 8 denial letter in an informal legal setting. While successful denial appeals are infrequent, there are cases that may warrant a review. For example, if, during the application verification process, a family member with a criminal background left the applying household and the housing authority was notified, yet a Section 8 denial letter was issued nonetheless, there is a good chance for a successful appeal.

To start the Section 8 denial appeal process, applicants are advised to meet with a housing authority representative. The representative can explain how to appeal Section 8 denial, once he or she has confirmed that an appeal is indeed the best course of action. If it is, the applicant must schedule a hearing with an administrative judge or hearing officer. During the Section 8 denial appeal hearing, the applicant and the housing authority will both give their side of the case. The judge or hearing officer will listen to both sides, read the Section 8 denial letter and after some deliberation make a decision.

Section 8 denial appeals are lengthy processes. Some cases may take a week while others could take up to a month or longer for a judge to reach a verdict. Once a verdict is reached, the parties will be dismissed and a copy of the decision will be mailed to both parties for their records.

How to Avoid Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in Connecticut

Requesting a Section 8 denial appeal can be a time-consuming undertaking. To avoid the time, effort, and potential stress of a hearing, it is best to avoid receiving a Section 8 denial letter in the first place. When filling out the eligibility application, be sure to ask for help, especially if this is an applicant's first experience with applying for Section 8. The public housing authority can help anyone looking to register for Section 8 housing. Applicants who ask for assistance are often less likely to receive Section 8 housing disqualifications on their applications.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.