Eligibility for Section 8 in Connecticut

Section 8 eligibility in Connecticut is determined based on whether the applicant meets certain federal, state, and local guidelines. The guidelines are determined by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in conjunction with the local housing authority in CT. When it comes to Section 8 eligibility in Connecticut, many residents make the mistake of thinking that yearly income is the only thing that determines their eligibility. While yearly household income is a large part of Section 8 eligibility, it is not the sole deciding factor. This leads many potential applicants to wonder, "What are the qualifications for low income housing in Connecticut?" and "What do I need to apply for Section 8?" among other questions. More specific information about Section 8 eligibility and qualifications are covered in the following subjects:

  • What are the requirements for Section 8 housing in Connecticut?
  • Do I qualify for Section 8 housing in Connecticut?
  • What do I need to apply for Section 8 housing in Connecticut?

What are the requirements for Section 8 housing in Connecticut?

When determining Section 8 eligibility in Connecticut, the housing authority looks at two primary things. The first is the overall size of the household, and the second is the total yearly income of all members in the household. Applicants are not required to have other members in their household in order to meet Section 8 eligibility in Connecticut. They can apply on an individual basis. When determining Section 8 eligibility, applicants will have to compare their yearly income and household size against some of the minimum requirements that are set by the state of Connecticut.

Do I qualify for Section 8 housing in Connecticut?

What are the qualifications for low income housing? In order to answer this question, applicants must figure out the median income of the neighborhood in which they are applying for assistance. The median income of a neighborhood is the collected average yearly income of all households in the area. Therefore, it is entirely normal for each neighborhood to have different income levels. Section 8 eligibility requirements state that the applicant must be making less than 30 percent of the median income for the neighborhood. Some neighborhoods may have slightly different Section 8 eligibility requirements, which would allow applicants to meet eligibility guidelines if they make 50 percent or less than the median income.

What do I need to apply for Section 8 housing in Connecticut?

In order to prove that an applicant meets Section 8 eligibility guidelines, he or she must provide certain types of documentation. Many of the documents must be presented for all members of the applicant household. One such required document is proof of identity, which is acceptable in different forms. Birth certificates, social security cards, drivers licenses, and passports-while all forms of identification-may or may not be acceptable depending on the applicant's local housing authority's requirements. Any applicants that are part of the military, active or inactive, are encouraged to use their military identification, since this may provide some additional benefits if they are accepted into the program.

The bulk of the documentation that applicants must present concerns their financial situations. In order to prove Section 8 eligibility, applicants must submit items such as pay stubs, recent bank statements, and tax returns. Section 8 eligibility guidelines also require that applicants who are already receiving some form of federal aid submit this information. During the interview process, applicants might also have to present additional information regarding their past living situation. Usually this includes a listing of contact information for previous landlords.

The Section 8 eligibility guidelines are covered in depth within the Section 8 housing applications. Applicants have two options available for obtaining Section 8 housing applications. One of the best ways to get an application is to visit the local housing authority website. This is a good option because the website contains plenty of information regarding Section 8 eligibility guidelines. Applicants can also visit the housing authority office in person to manually complete their application. Applicants that are confused about Section 8 eligibility guidelines might want to visit their local housing authority so they can speak directly with an agent.

Simply meeting all the Section 8 eligibility requirements does not translate to the applicant's immediate acceptance into the housing program. Applicants that meet all of the Section 8 eligibility requirements are placed on a waiting list, which is why it is imperative that they submit the application as soon as possible.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.