Section 8 Denial in Maryland

The reasons as to why a petitioner might receive a Section 8 denial letter in Maryland range from the very simple mistake of not signing a form to documentation being considered incomplete. Shortly after receiving the Section 8 denial letter, most applicants wonder what their next steps should be. Section 8 denial letters in MD will have a complete listing of the reasons for rejection spelled out in specific terms. Many Section 8 denial letters also list whether a simple correction is needed and that the applicant can simply resubmit. As well, in some instances, the Section 8 denial letter will indicate that a serious problem occurred with the documentation that was provided. In either case, Section 8 housing disqualifications in Maryland can be appealed, but there is a specific procedure that must be followed within given deadlines. To learn more about Section 8 denial letters, or the Section 8 denial letter appeal process, read below:

  • Section 8 housing disqualifications in Maryland
  • How to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications in Maryland
  • Learn how to appeal Section 8 denials in Maryland

Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in Maryland

"What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Maryland?" Section 8 housing disqualifications often occur because the processing agent at the PHA was not able to confirm or validate information either on the application or the accompanying documentation. Sometimes this can be something as innocuous as forgetting to sign the form. Other Section 8 housing disqualifications are issued because the information supplied was found unreliable or unconfirmable. This is why keeping the low income housing application current and up to date is so critical. However, if an applicant has received a Section 8 denial letter, has examined it for the list of reasons and still believes that ruling was unfair, then there are options. One of the first steps is to contact the PHA and ask for an appointment to discuss the Section 8 denial letter and whether or not you should make an appeal.

However, if the MD Section 8 housing disqualification was due to criminal activity, or a serious criminal history by the applicant or the applicant's family members, then no appeal is possible. However, it may be possible to file a Section 8 denial appeal if the family member with the criminal record is no longer living within the home. If a Section 8 denial letter has simple errors, then the local PHA will assist with the corrections needed to resubmit. It is important to note that with the Section 8 denial letter, there is legal recourse if the applicant disagrees with the ruling.

How to Avoid Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in Maryland

Section 8 denial appeals can be initiated at the local housing authority offices. A request for hearing form can be submitted to start the appeals process. However, avoiding the Section 8 housing disqualification in the first place is preferable than trying to convince the housing authority after the fact. The best way to avoid receiving the Section 8 denial letter is to take the time to fill everything out as accurately and completely as possible. Present the appropriate documentation and respond to any requests by the housing authority while they are processing the application. The Section 8 denial letter may indicate that the applicant was not a good fit for the program for which they applied but that they would benefit from a different program.

Learn How to Appeal Section 8 Denials in Maryland

In Maryland, the Section 8 denial appeal process is not overly complicated. The Section 8 denial appeal procedure begins with an examination of the actual Section 8 denial letter, itself, to determine why the application was rejected. If the candidate believes that the Section 8 denial letter has been sent in error, then a meeting with the PHA takes place. At this Section 8 denial appeal pre-meeting, the landlord of the intended rental may be present. After each has explained their position, either the Section 8 denial appeal is upheld and the applicant is placed back on the waiting list, or it moves on to adjudication with a judge. The Section 8 denial appeal process which involves a judge is not a formal hearing, but rather involves just the judge and the two parties involved. The petitioner should note that in most Section 8 denial appeal hearings, the judge will not issue a ruling immediately. A determination on the Section 8 denial letter will be mailed to all involved parties at least two weeks after the hearing takes place.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.