Section 8 Denial in South Carolina

In South Carolina, Section 8 denial letters are sent out when an applicant has been determined to be ineligible to receive Section 8 housing benefits. What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in SC? Section 8 housing disqualifications occur in South Carolina when an applicant has not filled out the forms completely or accurately, or when the application's substantiating documentation is inaccurate or not verifiable. South Carolina Section 8 denial letter recipients should consult the Section 8 denial letter, as it will list all the reasons for the denial. South Carolina residents who have received the Section 8 denial letter and who do not agree with its findings or conclusions do have options. South Carolina Section 8 denial appeals can be scheduled so that the application can be reviewed one last time. The formal process involves a judge, and the ruling is often final. To learn more about how to appeal Section 8 denial in South Carolina, select from the topics below:

  • What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in South Carolina?
  • How to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications in South Carolina
  • What to do if Section 8 application was denied in South Carolina

What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in South Carolina?

By law, South Carolina Section 8 denial letters have to list the reasons for the denial. Some Section 8 denial letters will not only list the reasons for rejection but also will also offer alternatives, options and even directions for taking action. Most SC Section 8 denial letters list reasons as simple as forgetting to sign the application, forgetting to fill out a page completely or placing the wrong birth year or date on personal information. In instances of simple Section 8 housing disqualifications such as these, some regional housing authorities will allow the applicant to resubmit. This is not true of every regional authority, so the Section 8 denial letter recipient can check with the local housing authority in his or her area to determine what the next steps should be. Many jurisdictions will stipulate that upon receiving the Section 8 denial letter, the petitioner must wait another year to submit.

How to Avoid Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in South Carolina

Section 8 housing disqualifications in South Carolina that are not simple omission errors are more serious. Sometimes, applicants have simply overestimated their own eligibility for benefits. Section 8 housing disqualifications will occur when a candidate has forgotten to include assets along with reported income. In these instances, the Section 8 denial letter will report that the makes too much money to qualify in his or her area. However, the applicant can apply in a county where his or her income would qualify for assistance. To determine the median salary range of an area, petitioners can simply go online and find the information.

Section 8 denial letters may be sent if the SC housing authority receives a negative background check for the applicant or the applicant's household. In these instances, there is little recourse. However, if the Section 8 denial letter recipient can prove that the family member no longer lives in the household or can indicate that it has been five years since any infraction with the law, an appeal might be possible.

Section 8 housing disqualifications can occur even if a Section 8 beneficiary is already living in a subsidized apartment or home. Once the award has been made, it is contingent upon the beneficiary continuing to maintain the standards required to retain the benefits.

What to Do if Section 8 Application Was Denied in South Carolina

There are instances where a Section 8 denial letter in SC has been issued, but is unwarranted. In such cases, a Section 8 denial appeal takes place. If an applicant believes that his or her Section 8 housing disqualifications are undeserved, then there is a specific process to appeal the ruling. The Section 8 denial appeal procedure in SC involves filling out a form called the Request for Hearing. A judge from the county clerk's office will be assigned to hear the case. The first step in the SC Section 8 denial appeal process is to speak with the regional housing authority to make certain that the refusal of housing benefits was justified. Next is the hearing with the judge where everyone states his or her case. The Section 8 denial appeal hearing is not a juried trial, but rather an informal session where the judge listens to both sides. The judge's ruling on the Section 8 denial letter in SC can take at least two weeks. The judge's ruling on the Section 8 housing disqualifications will be mailed to the involved parties, and in most cases, the judge's findings are considered irrevocable.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.