Section 8 Denial Letter in New Mexico

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Section 8 denial letters in New Mexico are sent out to those applicants whose HUD application is being denied. Section 8 housing disqualifications in NM occur when an applicant has either submitted an incomplete application, the information listed on the application cannot be confirmed or the information was found to be inaccurate. New Mexico Section 8 denial letter recipients should take the time to read the document carefully. The Section 8 denial letter will list the specific reasons why the application was rejected and may, in some instances, list what the applicant’s next steps should be. The Section 8 denial appeal process is for those who disagree with the Section 8 denial letter, and the reasons for rejection that are listed on the document. To learn more about what to do if Section 8 application was denied in New Mexico, refer to the following topics:

  • What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in New Mexico?
  • How to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications in New Mexico
  • How to appeal Section 8 denial letters in New Mexico

What are the Reasons for Section 8 Denial in New Mexico?

It is a federal requirement that Section 8 denial letters list the reasons for rejection of the application. Section 8 denial letters in NM also list alternatives and options, as well as information on the appeal process. What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in New Mexico? Unfortunately, sometimes the simplest of omissions can cause a rejected application. Section 8 denial letters will be issued when the form has been unsigned or if an applicant has placed an incorrect birthdate or year on the personal information section. If this is the reason for the Section 8 housing disqualification, then in many NM counties, the applicant will be urged to go ahead and resubmit as soon as the corrections are made. Still other counties have an inflexible application process and after a Section 8 housing disqualification has been issued, the recipient must wait another year before applying.

How to Avoid Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in New Mexico

Section 8 housing disqualifications that do not involve simple errors of omission will not be allowed to be resubmitted immediately. In most instances, if a Section 8 housing disqualification has been issued because of a negative background check, the process, as far as Section 8 is concerned, is finished. Negative background reports, including poor reports by previous landlords, a negative history on repayment of housing bills, or defaulting on previous Section 8 housing, are all grounds for Section 8 housing disqualifications in NM. Likewise, if a negative background check shows criminal records that are of a serious nature, and the perpetrator, whether the applicant or one of the family members, is still involved in serious criminal activity, the Section 8 housing disqualification will stand and there will be no room for appeal.

In many instances the Section 8 denial letter will be sent due to the fact that the applicant makes too much money to qualify. Most who apply and then receive the Section 8 denial letter in NM, have forgotten to add their assets and benefits received into their overall income figures. In order to qualify and not receive a Section 8 denial letter, then the candidate must make no more than 80 percent of those of average salary in the resident county.

How to Appeal Section 8 Denial Letters in New Mexico

Some Section 8 denial letters are sent to applicants who believe that they have received them in error. In such instances, an applicant has several options for how to appeal Section 8 denials. First, the Section 8 denial letter will list the reasons for denial. If the applicant believes that the reasons listed are in error, the first step is to contact the regional housing authority where the application was filed, and make an appointment to speak with an agent. Sometimes the agent will look at the Section 8 denial letter and agree that a Section 8 denial appeal should be made. In other case, the agent will not agree, and then the applicant can file for their own Section 8 denial appeal by filling out a form called the Formal Request for Section 8 Appeal. The form requests the services of a local judge to look over the document, listen to the plaintiff’s case, as well as the housing authority’s reason for rejection. The judge will deliberate for up to two weeks. Once the judge has made his or her decision in regards to the Section 8 housing disqualification, the decision will be mailed to all involved parties. In most cases, the judge’s ruling on the Section 8 denial will be final.