Section 8 Denial in Pennsylvania

What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in PA? A Pennsylvania Section 8 denial letter can be sent to a housing petitioner for many different reasons. The Pennsylvania Section 8 denial letter will list the specific reasons why the Section 8 application has been denied, and in some instances, it will suggest ways to fix the problem. If the PA Section 8 denial letter lists the reason as an incomplete application, then the applicant may take steps to correct this problem. Contacting the local public housing authority to discuss the Section 8 housing disqualifications is the quickest route to address a housing disqualification. If the applicant is still not satisfied after speaking with the housing authority about the PA Section 8 denial letter, then there are other options. A formal PA Section 8 denial appeal can be submitted. Learn more about what to do if Section 8 application was denied in Pennsylvania by reading the topics below:

  • What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Pennsylvania?
  • How to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications in Pennsylvania
  • How to appeal Section 8 denial in Pennsylvania

What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Pennsylvania?

The applicant receiving the PA Section 8 denial letter should know that if the housing authority has discovered criminal activity on the part of the applicant or a member of the household, then a Section 8 denial appeal will not be an option, unless the offender no longer lives in the household. In these cases, the petitioner receiving the Section 8 denial letter in Pennsylvania must go in person to the housing authority and offer evidence that the offender is no longer in the home.

Often, Section 8 housing disqualifications in Pennsylvania occur when an application is incomplete or is missing signatures. Where these Section 8 housing disqualifications is concerned, the local housing authority can assist the applicant with remedying such mistakes.

Furthermore, Section 8 housing disqualifications in PA may apply only to the federal application, instead of the local application. Many Section 8 candidates erroneously believe that the Section 8 housing disqualification applies to all of the Section 8 applications that were submitted, when in fact, only one application was actually rejected. While the Section 8 housing disqualifications may be for the federal application, the state and local application may still be in process. If the reason for the Section 8 housing disqualifications does not list whether it was the federal or state application that was rejected, a call to the local housing authority can clear up any confusion.

How to Avoid Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in Pennsylvania

Most PA applicants would like to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications if possible. The best way to avoid disqualifications is to take the time to submit the application correctly the first time. This can be done in several ways, such as consulting a housing authority to receive personal assistance from a representative in filling out the forms. In the instance where one has already received a Section 8 denial letter, the housing authority representative can assist with resubmitting the forms. The representative can also explain how to appeal Section 8 denials in Pennsylvania should the petitioner decide he or she would like to pursue this next step.

How to Appeal Section 8 Denial in Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Section 8 denial appeal process begins with a very strict procedure. In essence, the applicant is asking the housing authority to review its decision one more time. Section 8 housing disqualifications in PA are taken very seriously, so the denial appeal process will involve a formal hearing that involves a judge. Unlike a typical court trial, however, a PA Section 8 denial appeal hearing will usually be comprised of a judge, the petitioner who filed the Section 8 denial appeal and the landlord or homeowner. During the Section 8 denial appeal hearing, the applicant will present any evidence that will contraindicate the findings of the housing authority in processing the application. The landlord and the housing authority will also explain their reasons for the Section 8 housing disqualifications and will ask the judge to uphold their decision. After the Section 8 denial appeal hearing, the judge can take up to two weeks or more to reach a decision. Once the judge arrives at a decision in regards to the Section 8 denial appeal, he or she will mail the verdict to all involved parties. Once the judge has made a decision about the Section 8 denial, the determination of ineligibility cannot be appealed any further. However, the applicant can resubmit a Section 8 application after one year.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.