Section 8 Denial in Alabama

An AL Section 8 denial letter will arrive in the mail in the event that a Section 8 application has been denied. Your Section 8 denial letter should arrive within the two-week waiting period after your application was submitted. What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in AL? The Section 8 denial letter will formally detail what to do if Section 8 application was denied, as well as the reasons for the denial. For more information on what to do if Section 8 application was denied, consult the following topics:

  • What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Alabama?
  • How to avoid Section 8 housing disqualifications in Alabama
  • How to appeal Section 8 denial in Alabama

What are the reasons for Section 8 denial in Alabama?

Section 8 housing disqualifications can be due to a wide range of factors. One of the main reasons an applicant will receive a Section 8 denial letter in Alabama is criminal activity. Anyone with criminal charges will be limited in what they can apply for if the charges are minor. A Section 8 housing disqualification will be issued immediately, with little chance of a Section 8 denial appeal, for applicants with serious criminal charges, such as sexual offenders or those with drug convictions. Other reasons for receiving a Section 8 denial letter include being behind on child support payments or current rental commitments and, in some cases, even a decent credit score could limit or be grounds for a Section 8 denial.

Be sure to read the Section 8 denial letter carefully. if an applicant has applied for both state and federal housing, the Section 8 denial letter may only contain a rejection for one level of housing but not the other. There are certain things that may cause an applicant to be issued a Section 8 denial letter on either the federal or state level. For example, if an applicant applied for Federal Housing, they must be issued a Section 8 denial letter if any discrepancies arise concerning: household members being engaged in illegal substance use, serious alcohol abuse, is a convicted sexual offender, or if there is a history of eviction. However, in state-level Section 8, issues that may result in Section 8 housing disqualifications include such issues as evictions, previous termination from Section 8, owing a housing authority, failure to uphold obligations required for housing vouchers, and threatening housing staff. If a Section 8 denial letter was issued to a Section 8 applicant who has applied for the Alternative Housing Voucher Program (AHVP), they may be denied for the same reasons.

How to Avoid Section 8 Housing Disqualifications in Alabama

There are plenty of reasons for Section 8 housing disqualifications in Alabama that are easily avoidable or fixable. The most common reason for a section 8 denial letter is documentation. In many cases an applicant has either incorrectly filled out the application or has left an important piece of documentation out of the pack when it was submitted. If this is the case, to avoid another Section 8 denial letter, the applicant must instead submit another application with all appropriate documentation attached. It is important to attach every piece of documentation to this second application, not just the documentation that was missing from the first one.

Likewise, Section 8 housing disqualifications can be issued simply because the applicant did not meet all of the qualifications necessary for Section 8 housing. In the Alabama Section 8 denial letter it should state whether an applicant's income is too high, or they are not considered a United States citizen or legal resident, or they have not lived in the state for long enough.

Learn How to Appeal Section 8 Denial in Alabama

Wondering what to do if a Section 8 application was denied? Approximately 99 percent of the time, Section 8 denial letters are warranted. However, an applicant can make a Section 8 denial appeal in the event where they believe Section 8 housing disqualifications were made erroneously. A Section 8 denial appeal in Alabama involves an applicant formally requesting that their denied application be re-examined in an informal court hearing. If approved, the hearing will feature testimony from both the applicant and the housing authority, who will give their sides of the case, along with the Section 8 denial letter, to a third party hearing officer or administrative judge. The third party will then make the executive decision to either repeal or uphold the denial. Section 8 denial appeals must be filed within 14 to 30 days after the Section 8 denial was first sent. If an applicant requires help on how to appeal Section 8 denial, they may contact the HUD office to ask for assistance from an HUD representative.


What is Section 8?

The Section 8 program was created by the federal government to assist low-income individuals and families with finding affordable private housing. To learn how you can become a member of this assistance program, download our helpful guide today. Beneficiaries of the program have a percentage of their rent covered by the government via housing subsidies, which are administered on a local level by public housing agencies or PHAs directly to landlords. Section 8 members are allowed to choose apartments, townhouses or even modest homes in this program, but the landlord must accept government subsidies in order for the provided housing vouchers to be used. Learn more about how you can qualify for housing assistance and discover the steps to file an application by clicking here.


How much will my housing subsidy be?

As a Section 8 beneficiary, you will pay the difference between your landlord’s rent amount and how much your housing subsidy covers. To find out how you can get a housing subsidy, download our guide now. If you are accepted into the Section 8 program, your public housing agency will calculate the maximum assistance you can receive. Your maximum housing assistance will either be the total rent of your apartment/home minus 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income or it will be the payment standard less 30 percent of your adjusted monthly income, whichever amount is lower. To find out how Section 8 can benefit you today, click here.