Eligibility for Section 8 in Washington D.C.

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Washington D.C. Section 8 eligibility criteria can often be unclear due to conflicting information that is presented about the program. What causes many applicants to ask, “Do I qualify for Section 8 housing?” is typically the information surrounding income and qualifying limits. Applicants are expected to meet federal, state, and local Section 8 eligibility guidelines to be eligible to receive benefits, and in many cases an applicant may qualify on the federal level, but fail to meet requirements set by the housing authority agencies on the state and local levels. What are the qualifications for low income housing in each Washington D.C. area? Listings of the median salaries for each D.C. area are listed online. Income qualifications are largely determined by the area’s median salary ranges, and whether or not the applicant (and the applicant’s household) fall below that average. Only those who make at least 50 percent less than the average income for their area qualify for assistance in most cases.

For more information on Section 8 eligibility in Washington D.C., read the following topics:

  • What are the requirements for Section 8 in Washington D.C.?
  • What are the qualifications for low income housing in Washington D.C.?
  • What do I need to apply for Section 8 in Washington D.C.?

What are the requirements for Section 8 in Washington D.C.?

Section 8 eligibility in Washington D.C. differs from stipulations in Virginia and Maryland, however, income, citizenship, residency, and background are similarly taken into account. Applicants must fall below the average salary earned for their area. Section 8 eligibility is based on the total combined income of the household, so if other family members work and contribute to the household income, their contribution must be included in the application. Additional assets are also considered if they are worth more than 2,000 dollars.

Section 8 eligibility in D.C. gives preference to applications that are submitted by or include senior citizens, the disabled, pregnant women and those who are considered legally homeless. Applicants who are eligible in their area can also apply in other areas. However, the applicant must be prepared to move to and reside in the area where his or her application is accepted. Most who receive Section 8 eligibility and are placed on a waiting list have ample time to make these residence adjustments as the waiting time from application to voucher disbursement can be considerably lengthy. Section 8 eligibility in D.C. requires that those who apply be U.S. citizens and legal residents of Washington D.C.

Those applying for Section 8 eligibility in D.C. must have a positive rental history as any reports of abusive behavior toward neighbors, landlords or the property can result in the denial of assistance. While convicted felons are not precluded from applying for Section 8 in D.C., they must not have been convicted of a violent crime or be listed on any national or state sexual offender lists. Likewise, those who have been convicted of producing illegal substances for sale are prohibited from applying for assistance.

What are the qualifications for low income housing in Washington D.C.?

Section 8 eligibility in Washington D.C. requires both the application and documentation to be as accurate as possible. To qualify, applicants must determine their income limits, to see whether it matches current poverty levels for the area. They must also make sure that all family members possess clear background checks, including rental histories. Those who are new to the Section 8 eligibility process are advised to work closely with a trained HUD application specialist in their area to make sure to submit an application that stands less chance of rejection.

What do I need to apply for Section 8 in Washington D.C.?

What do I need to apply for Section 8 housing in Washington D.C.? Once they have determined their Section 8 eligibility, applicants are required to submit a completed application form and specific types of supplemental documentation. Each of the informational sections on an HUD application must have attached the corresponding documentation for verification. Missing or incomplete documentation will likely result in receipt of a Section 8 denial letter. While certain counties may ask for more or differing documentation, in general a Section 8 eligibility applicant will need to provide the following:

  • Social Security cards for everyone living in the home
  • Proof of residency in the county (utility bill, or letter from a shelter)
  • A listing of any other government benefits
  • Current transcripts (if applicable)
  • Official birth certificates for everyone in the household
  • Pay stubs and tax returns (three months’ worth if applicable)
  • A listing of current debts and assets
  • Identification for everyone living in the home